Vascular Surgery Treatments and Procedures

Treatment for vascular disease varies depending on type and severity. Experts in the Vascular Medicine Program, part of the Frankel Cardiovascular Center at Michigan Medicine, take a comprehensive approach to treating vascular disease. We offer a variety of treatment options, from lifestyle modification and medications, to the latest catheter-based endovascular procedures and traditional surgical interventions.

Lifestyle Modification

Often, the first step for an individual with vascular disease is lifestyle modification, which may include exercise, smoking cessation, eating a low-cholesterol diet and controlling diabetes.

Medication

Medications to help manage cholesterol and platelet function may be required for some vascular disease patients.

Minimally Invasive Endovascular Options

The U-M Vascular Surgery team is a national leader in performing endovascular procedures. 

Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair (TEVAR, pTEVAR): For many patients with thoracic aortic aneurysms, TEVAR is an alternative to conventional open surgery. This minimally invasive endovascular procedure can be incisionless (pTEVAR) or with small incisions in the groin (to insert a catheter), followed by the placement of a stent graft to repair the aneurysm. TEVAR is an option for some patients who are not optimal candidates for traditional open repair. TEVAR is a treatment for the following conditions:

For more information visit our TEVAR page.

Endovascular Aneurysm Repair (EVAR, pEVAR): This minimally invasive procedure, used to repair an abdominal aortic aneurysm, can be incisionless or with a small incision in the groin (to insert a catheter), followed by the placement of a stent graft to repair the aneurysm. Once it is in place, blood flow can continue through the aorta without filling or putting pressure on the aneurysm – preventing further growth and possible rupture. EVAR is a treatment for the following condition:

For more information, visit our EVAR page.

Fenestrated Endovascular Aneurysm Repair (FEVAR, pFEVAR): FEVAR is a minimally invasive option for treating a complex abdominal aortic aneurysm. This minimally invasive procedure can be incisionless or with small incisions in the groin followed by placement of a stent graft to repair the aneurysm while preserving blood flow to the kidneys, intestines, stomach and liver. FEVAR is a treatment for the following condition:

For more information, visit our FEVAR page.

Angioplasty & Stenting: A procedure in which a catheter-guided balloon is used to open a narrowed artery. A stent (a wire-mesh tube that expands to hold the artery open) is usually placed at the narrowed section during angioplasty. Angioplasty and stenting is a treatment for the following conditions:

For more information, visit our Angioplasty and Stenting page.

Cryoplasty: A procedure similar to angioplasty in which a vascular surgeon inserts a balloon catheter into a blocked artery to repair an obstruction within the vessel. Once the balloon catheter reaches the site of the blockage, it is filled with liquid nitrous oxide, which immediately evaporates into a gas, causing the balloon to inflate and freeze the surrounding tissue, promoting the dilation or opening of the artery while minimizing the potential for growth of new scar tissue, and reduces the likelihood that the blockage in the treated location will reoccur. Cryoplasty is a treatment for the following condition:

Percutaneous or Laser Atherectomy: A procedure in which a vascular surgeon inserts a specialized catheter into a blocked artery to remove a buildup of atherosclerotic plaque from within the vessel. The catheter contains a sharp rotating blade, grinding bit, or laser filament, as well as a collection system that permits the surgeon to remove the plaque from the wall of the vessel and collect or suction any resulting debris. Percutaneous or Laser Atherectomy is a treatment for the following conditions:

Hemodialysis Access

The following are two methods of hemodialysis access. To learn more visit our Hemodialysis Access by Vascular Surgeons page.

AV fistula: A method of hemodialysis access in which a piece of a vein is taken from the arm or leg and sewn into a nearby artery. The sewn-in vein eventually enlarges, becoming stronger and thicker.

AV graft:  A method of hemodialysis access in which a prosthetic graft is sewn between an artery and vein in the arm or leg.

Surgical Options

For many vascular patients, surgery is the medical option that best meets their needs. Our vascular surgeons perform a wide range of procedures with the goal of achieving the best patient outcomes.

Open Abdominal Aortic Surgery

This open surgery involves an abdominal incision to gain access to the abdominal aorta. For aneurysms, the aneurysm is opened and a fabric graft is sutured into the proximal and distal ends of the aorta and fixed into place. The dilated portion of the aorta is then closed over the graft. For patients with blockages in the aorta or iliac vessels, a graft is sewn in to redirect blood around the areas of blockage.

Bypass Surgery

A surgical procedure to redirect blood flow around an area of blockage. The procedure creates an alternate channel for blood flow, bypassing an obstructed or damaged vessel. The graft may come from a healthy section of the patient's own vein, or a synthetic material may be used. Bypass grafting is a treatment for the following conditions:

Open Carotid and Femoral Endarterectomy

This procedure involves the surgical removal of plaque build-up on the inner lining of the artery. Endarterectomy is a treatment for the following conditions:

Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

This is an open surgical procedure to decompress the thoracic outlet in patients with neurogenic, venous or aterial thoracic outlet syndrome. 

Make an Appointment

To make an appointment to discuss your need for vascular treatment, call the U-M Frankel Cardiovascular Center Call Center at 888-287-1082 or email us at CVCCallCtr@med.umich.edu. Visit our Make an Appointment page for more information about what to expect when you call us.